lift


lift
lift vb 1 Lift, raise, rear, elevate, hoist, heave, boost are comparable when meaning to move from a lower to a higher place or position.
Lift often carries an implication of effort exerted to overcome the resistance of weight
{

lift a large stone

}
{

lift a pail of water from the ground

}
{

lift a child to one's shoulders

}
but it may be extended to whatever rises high by natural or artificial means or processes
{

high lifted up were many lofty towers— Spenser

}
{

a high conical peak . . . lifted some four thousand feet into the sky— Kyne

}
or to something immaterial that rises or is made to rise (as in spirit, in feeling, or in aspiration)
{

the news lifted a weight from his mind

}
{

he was lifted by his simple love of all creatures ... far above right and wrong— Webb

}
Raise may suggest less effort than lift, but it carries a stronger implication of bringing something to the vertical or to a high position for which it is fitted by nature or intended function; thus, one raises a pole by setting it on end, but one lifts it by picking it up; a flag is raised to the top of its staff, but it is lifted when held high enough to be seen
{

those arts which were destined to raise our Gothic cathedrals— Coulton

}
In extended use raise may imply a lifting to a higher level (as of worth, efficiency, or accomplishment)
{

the most wholehearted attempt ever made to raise the individual to his highest power—Day Lewis

}
Rear is often used in place of raise
{

the mast we rearPope

}
{

the maypole was rearedIrving

}
but, unlike raise, it can be used intransitively with the meaning to raise itself or, in the case of a horse, to raise its forelegs
{

the . . . storm clouds reared on high— Millay

}
{

horses, rearing and prancing— Anderson

}
Elevate may be used in place of lift or raise in certain collocations where it does not seem unduly formal or pretentious
{

an eagle rising with wings elevated—FoxDavies

}
{

mobile field pieces . . . were elevated for range in even more slow and primitive ways— Wintringham

}
but, in general, the word suggests exaltation, uplifting, or enhancing
{

elevate a priest to a bishopric

}
{

elevate one's standards of literary taste

}
{

his renown soared still higher. He had elevated the white man's name in Africa again— James Cameron

}
Hoist implies raising something heavy aloft, often by such mechanical means as a tackle
{

hoist a cargo into a ship

}
{

hoist a sail

}
{

Mrs. Malins was helped down the front steps by her son and Mr. Browne and, after many maneuvers, hoisted into the cab— Joyce

}
{

it takes five power Winches to hoist this mammoth expanse of canvas— Monsanto Mag.

}
Heave implies a lifting upward or onward with strain or effort usually by impulsion from without
{

a boat heaved high by a wave

}
{

nature's way of creating a mountain peak- first the heaving up of some blunt monstrous bulk of rumpled rock— Montague

}
Boost implies lifting by or as if by means of a push or other help from below, usually without the suggestion of strain or effort found in hoist and heave
{

boost prices

}
{

friendly critics boosted the sales of his books

}
{

no matter how depressed he might be, a few cocktails always boosted his spirits

}
{

David tenderly boosted Elimelech up the steps and through the door— Douglas

}
Analogous words: *rise, arise, ascend, levitate, mount, soar, tower, rocket, surge: *exalt, magnify, aggrandize: heighten, enhance, intensify
Antonyms: lower
Contrasted words: reduce, lessen, diminish, *decrease: *abase, debase, degrade, demean, humble, humiliate: *depress, weigh, oppress
2 purloin, filch, *steal, pilfer, pinch, snitch, swipe, cop

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lift — may mean:*Lift (force), a mechanical force generated by a solid object moving through a fluid *Lift (soaring), rising air used by soaring birds and glider, hang glider and paraglider pilots for soaring flight *Lift (soft drink), a brand of… …   Wikipedia

  • lift — [ lift ] n. m. • 1909; de l angl. lifted shot « coup soulevé » ♦ Anglic. Au tennis, Effet donné à une balle en la frappant de bas en haut, de façon à en augmenter le rebond. ● lift nom masculin (anglais lift, de to lift, soulever) Au tennis,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Lift — Lift, n. 1. Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted. [1913 Webster] 2. The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 3. Help; assistance, as by lifting. Hence: A ride in a vehicle, given by the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lift — (l[i^]ft), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lifted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Lifting}.] [Icel. lypta, fr. lopt air; akin to Sw. lyfta to lift, Dan. l[ o]fte, G. l[ u]ften; prop., to raise into the air. See {Loft}, and cf. 1st {Lift}.] 1. To move in a direction… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lift — [lift] vt. [ME liften < ON lypta < lopt, air, akin to OE lyft, Ger luft, Du lucht] 1. to bring up to a higher position; raise 2. to pick up and move or set [lift the box down from the shelf] 3. to hold up; support high in the air 4. to… …   English World dictionary

  • lift — LIFT, lifturi, s.n. Ascensor. – Din engl., fr. lift. Trimis de RACAI, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DEX 98  LIFT s. v. ascensor. Trimis de siveco, 13.09.2007. Sursa: Sinonime  lift s. n., pl. lífturi …   Dicționar Român

  • lift — lift; lift·able; lift·er; lift·man; shop·lift; shop·lift·er; shop·lift·ing; up·lift·er; up·lift·ment; up·lift·ed·ness; …   English syllables

  • LIFT — vt: to put an end to: make no longer effective lift the stay Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. lift I …   Law dictionary

  • Lift Me Up — may refer to: *Lift Me Up, an unreleased song by Live recorded during the Throwing Copper sessions * Lift Me Up , a 1990 single by Jeff Lynne. * Lift Me Up (Kate Voegele song) , a 2008 song by Kate Voegele * Lift Me Up , a 1992 single by Howard… …   Wikipedia

  • lift — [n1] transportation car ride, drive, journey, passage, ride, run, transport; concept 155 lift [n2] help, aid assist, assistance, boost, comfort, encouragement, hand, leg up*, pickme up*, reassurance, relief, secours, shot in the arm*, succor,… …   New thesaurus